Occupational Injuries and Diseases in Canada, 1996-2008

The purpose of this publication is to offer statistical tables (along with selected graphs and some interpretation thereof) to an audience of clients in the Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) community-federal jurisdiction (FJ) employers, FJ compliance staff, academic researchers, health and safety organizations, federal government OHS staff, and the general public. The material consists primarily of work accidents by type and accident rates in the FJ over the last five years of data experience, broken down by industry and province.

These statistics provide users in government, industry, labour, and academia with a factual basis for establishing and evaluating health and safety programs.

Section I details some major highlights resulting from the statistical data.

Sections II - III describe the concepts used in this publication, the principal sources of data, and the data collection methods, including a discussion of their limitations.

Section IV analyzes injury and workers' compensation statistics for Canadian industries in all jurisdictions. The data comes from occupational injury claims submitted by employers to provincial/territorial workers' compensation boards/commissions and from employment data published by Statistics Canada.

The majority of the data presented in this report were obtained from official data already released to the general public by the Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada (AWCBC).

For enquiries regarding this report please contact:
Manager, Research and Analysis
Occupational Health and Safety Division,
Labour Program,
Human Resources and Skills Development Canada,
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0J9
Telephone: (819) 994-1716

I. Highlights

The following are the major highlights of the data that is presented in this statistical report.

  • In Canada, over the period 1996 to 2008, an average of slightly less than one million occupational injury claims have been reported each year by provincial or territorial WCBs.
  • On average, just under 400,000 (355,318) applications were accepted for compensation for a loss of wages (as "time-loss" injuries).
  • The incidence rate of time-loss injuries per 100 workers across all jurisdictions in Canada has steadily declined in all years since 1996 (with the exception of 2000 only).
  • One Canadian worker out of every 46 workers covered by provincial or territorial compensation systems was injured severely enough to miss at least one day of work in 2008. This represents approximately one compensated time-loss injury for every two minutes worked.
  • In Canada, in 2008, there were approximately three occupational fatalities each day of the year . Also in 2008, approximately one worker out of every 13,805 workers covered by provincial or territorial compensation systems died from an occupational injury.
  • Over the 1996 to 2008 period, compensation payments to injured workers, after adjusting for inflation, have generally shown an increasing trend.
  • In 2008, the WCBs paid $7.67 billion in benefit payments, or an average of approximately $24,845 per each new compensated ("accepted") time-loss injury or fatality.
  • In addition, the WCBs paid $2.03 billion in health care and vocational rehabilitation payments in 2008. Including these costs, the total direct annual costs of occupational injuries and fatalities to the Canadian economy were approximately $9.7 billion in 2008.
  • Factoring in direct and indirect costs, the total costs of occupational injuries to the Canadian economy, can now be estimated to be more than $19 billion annually.
  • The four provinces with the highest 2008 derived compensation quotients, (see "definitions and glossary"), per accepted time-loss injury or fatality, were: Ontario, at $42,792, Newfoundland and Labrador, at $30,008; Nova Scotia at $29,887 and New Brunswick at $28,625.
  • Derived 2008 compensation quotients were lowest in the Western provinces (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Alberta), all of which were considerably lower than the Canadian average in 2008.

II. Sources of Data, Collection Methods and Limitations

Data presented in this report were collected from the AWCBC's National Work Injuries Statistics Program (NWISP), Board/ Commission Financial and Statistical Data, and Key Statistical Measures (KSMs), as well as data from Statistics Canada.

While the Labour Program's responsibilities in the area of occupational accident reporting and prevention are restricted to employers under federal jurisdiction, (as stipulated in the Canada Labour Code, Part II, Occupational Health and Safety), this report has been produced in order to provide national occupational injuries and compensation data to all interested users of this kind of statistical information. Data on occupational injuries, diseases and fatalities relating to the federal jurisdiction can be found in the annually updated HRSDC publication, Occupational Injuries among Canadian Federal Jurisdiction Employers. (The reporting of occupational injuries compensation data for employers under federal jurisdiction is not a requirement of the Canada Labour Code, Part II, Occupational Health and Safety.)

2.1 Workers' Compensation Board Data: Coverage and Limitations

The work injury and disease statistics published in this report originate from administrative records used by the 12 provincial and territorial Workers' Compensation Boards (WCBs) and Commissions to record time-loss claims from injured workers (Northwest Territories & Nunavut are combined). NWISP was established to utilize these claims' records from the Workers' Compensation Boards/ Commissions for statistical purposes. Since 1996, this program has been coordinated by the AWCBC, in cooperation with the 12 Workers' Compensation jurisdictions.

The administrative records provide a readily accessible data source for work-related injury and disease statistics. However, these administrative data were collected by each Board/ Commission to meet their specific program requirements, (the compensation and rehabilitation of workers injured or killed on the job), and were not originally designed to produce an occupational health and safety (OHS) information system. Nevertheless, the WCBs have emerged as the primary source of OHS data for comparing the occupational injury experience of all Canadian jurisdictions. The data in this document are subject to the collection practices, reporting requirements, claims policies and definitions employed by each of the various boards and commissions. However, the AWCBC does endeavour to ensure consistent definitions, reporting methods and reporting periods (reference or time) have been used or applied to the data for each of the provincial/ territorial WCBs.

The (NWISP) states that within each of the 12 Boards or Commissions, the data are consistent over time, but differences may be observed if inter-jurisdictional comparisons are made.[1: go to footnote 1] According to the (NWISP), variances can arise because the acts and regulations administered by each of the Boards are not identical and each Board has unique operating procedures.[2: go to footnote 2] Also, the (NWISP) makes data users aware that the population covered may be restricted, or can vary between each of the 12 jurisdictions. In the case of workers' compensation, it has been estimated that approximately 80% of workers are covered under a provincial/territorial workers' compensation scheme; with coverage differing slightly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. For example, self-employed persons may be excluded, as well as professional offices and industries such as finance.[3: go to footnote 3]

Total (benefit) payments or compensation figures shown in this publication include all payments made for compensation during the reference year, regardless of the accident year, i.e. "for all years paid during the year", rather than the cost of benefits related to accidents and diseases that occurred within that year. Payment amounts for injury compensation figures include those for both assessable and self-insured employers. These figures exclude administration expenses, but include all benefit types: short-term disability, long-term disability, survivors' benefits, and healthcare and rehabilitation services.

The "total claims reported" figures relate to all new claims reported within the reference year regardless of accident year, and the "accepted time-loss injuries" relate to all compensated lost-time claims resulting from accidents which occurred in the reference year, and diseases, which were diagnosed or reported in the reference year.

2.2 Statistics Canada Employment Data (Number of Workers Covered)

As actual data on the number of workers covered by provincial WCBs is not available from the provincial and territorial Boards/ Commissions or the AWCBC, the employment data used in Section IV of the report are taken from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) annual averages figures published by Statistics Canada, in its publication, Labour Force Historical Review, Statistics Canada, Product No. 71F0004XCB, 2008. Because the territories are not covered by the LFS, the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut employment figures are taken from the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH), Annual Averages, Cat. 72-002-X, includes classified and unclassified enterprises or businesses). SEPH employment totals are for paid employees only; they do not include the self-employed (LFS employment figures, however, include all categories of workers).

The employment figures were then adjusted by using AWCBC "percentage of workforce covered" figures to derive "number of workers covered" estimates. These figures indicate the percentage of the provincial/ territorial workforce (employed labour force) that is effectively covered by the compensation system in that province or territory. The reader should note that the AWCBC "percentage of workforce covered" figures are estimates only and the reliability of these figures is subject to limitations resulting from the absence of a detailed count of workers in the databases of the Boards/ Commissions. In addition, for years where "percentage of workforce covered" data were not available (1996-1999), the average for the four years immediately following these years (or 2000 - 2003) was calculated and applied to these years. Applying this value to those years where data is not available provides for an accurate estimation because no trends are evident and percentages remain relatively constant for the period 2001 - 2003, suggesting that they have changed little from the preceding 1996 - 1999 period.

2.3 Advisory on jurisdictional rate comparisons

Some data users may attempt to compare the performance of the provincial and territorial labour jurisdictions to the federal jurisdiction (FJ) on the basis of injury rate figures. Some very important differences exist between the injury rate statistics published here and those published for federal jurisdiction employers. Federal jurisdiction injury data and provincial data come from different, non-compatible sources. The respective injury rates are also calculated using different methods: those presented in this report are based on accepted time-loss injuries per 100 workers. While accepted time-loss injuries and disabling injuries are conceptually similar, federal jurisdiction injury rates, including the "disabling injuries incidence rate" and the "injury incidence rate", include fatal injuries and fatal and minor injuries (in the case of the latter rate). The fact that federal and provincial jurisdictions cover industries that vary widely in their relative potential for work injury must also be considered.

Moreover, we caution users interested in making injury rate comparisons between the national (all provincial and territorial jurisdictions) and FJ data series, for the following reasons:

Injury rates for provincial and territorial jurisdictions:

  • These injury counts are based on WCB data for the number of work-related injury cases accepted for compensation during the year. Generally, only a subset of the claims received is accepted.
  • The number of occupational injuries compensated during a particular year includes claims originating in previous years for which payments continue to be made in the current year.
  • WCB data (all of Canada) includes compensated cases for employees in industries under federal jurisdiction as well as provincial jurisdictions.[4: go to footnote 4]
  • The number of injuries reported will vary between jurisdictions depending on the different types of injuries and illnesses that are accepted for compensation.
  • In addition, for jurisdictions where there is a waiting period before compensation is payable[5: go to footnote 5], time-loss injuries will be relatively underestimated.
  • As explained above, "number of workers covered" estimates must be derived based on Statistics Canada employment data and AWCBC "percentage of workforce covered" estimates.

Injury rates for the federal jurisdiction:

  • These are based on injury data and employment data supplied by employers annually to HRSDC.
  • All work-related injuries and illnesses are reported regardless of whether they were accepted for compensation or not.
  • Under-reporting of work injuries may also occur, since there is no monetary incentive (or compensation data) associated with the work injuries data reported by federally-regulated employers.[6: go to footnote 6]
  • Federal employers actually report "full-time equivalents" (FTEs) and these figures are directly used in the calculation of FJ injury rates.

The statistics presented in this report, especially injury and fatality rates, should be used and interpreted with all of these data limitations in mind.

III. Definitions and Glossary

Accepted Time-Loss Injury: An injury where an employee is compensated for a loss of wages following a work-related accident (or exposure to a noxious substance), or receives compensation for a permanent disability with or without any time lost in his or her employment (for example, hearing loss from excessive noise in the work place).

Relates to all ('new") compensated lost-time claims resulting from accidents, which occurred in the reference year, or which were reported/ diagnosed in the reference year in the case of disease and were accepted for payment during the reference year (or the three month period immediately following the reference year). Figures shown in this publication include all time-loss claims for both assessable and self-insured employers.

All Jurisdictions: Includes all works, undertakings or businesses in all provinces or territories in Canada, as well as all federal government activities.

Compensation Quotient (A and B): The result of dividing "Total Payments (current dollars)" by "Total Claims" (A) and by "Accepted Time-Loss Injuries" and "Fatalities" (B). Although these statistics provide some indication of the relationship between the total number of workers' compensation claims or accepted time-loss injuries (and fatalities) and the total amount of benefit payments paid, caution should be used in attempting to use "compensation quotient" figures as a variation on "payment per claim or injury". The reason for this is that compensation amounts shown in this report relate not only to newly-reported claims in the given calendar year, but to all claims paid in that year, including those originating in earlier accident or entry years.

Fatality (Fatal Injury): A fatality is a death resulting from a work-related incident (including disease) that has been accepted for compensation by a provincial or territorial Board or Commission. A fatality is recorded during the year when the claim was accepted by a Board or Commission, not the year when the incident causing the death occurred.

Fatality Incidence Rate: The number of deaths resulting from a work-related incident per 100,000 workers over a given period.

Federal Jurisdiction: Federal jurisdiction covers those works, undertakings or businesses that are within the legislative authority of the Parliament of Canada. It also includes any work declared to be for the general advantage of two or more provinces and outside the exclusive authority of the provincial legislatures.

Full-Time Equivalent (FTE): The employment of one person full-time or more than one person part-time, such that the total working time is the equivalent of one person working full time. FTEs are measured in person-years. For instance, 100 people employed full time equals 100 FTEs; 10 people employed part-time and working half the time (relative to full-time) equals 5 FTEs; and all 110 people represent 105 FTEs.

Occupational Injury/ Disease: Any injury, disease or illness incurred by an employee in the performance of or in connection with his or her work.

Percentage of Workforce Covered: The percentage of the workforce that is effectively covered by the workers' compensation system. The number of persons covered by the workers' compensation system is the sum of two main components, the first being the workers of assessable employers and self-employed workers opting for coverage and the second being the workers of self-insured employers and workers of the government of Canada (federal departments and agencies, and Crown Corporations). Workers excluded from this measure are those eligible for personal coverage, but not opting for it, and those workers explicitly excluded by the jurisdiction's legislation.

The numerator is calculated by each jurisdiction through the technique that is most suitable to its circumstances. The numerator should represent the average number of covered workers during the year. In order to achieve consistency with the denominator, each part-time worker must be considered as one worker. One of two methods is utilized, depending on the structure of coverage in the jurisdiction. One method is applied in jurisdictions where the law covers all salaried workers with only a few minor exceptions. The number of excluded workers is calculated by using general statistical data on the labour force and the number of self-employed workers is extracted from the database of the Board. The other method consists of estimating the number of workers covered from the assessable payroll provided to the Board/ Commission by employers. This is achieved by dividing the payroll by the appropriate average salary.

The reliability of this indicator is subject to certain limitations resulting from the absence of a detailed count of workers in the database of the Boards/ Commissions. In order to achieve a reasonable result, each Board uses the technique that best suits its circumstances. The techniques involve the setting of assumptions that are subject to a certain degree of uncertainty. Full accuracy is not achievable at reasonable cost in terms of collecting data in each jurisdiction. Nevertheless, this indicator is considered to be the best estimate for measuring the proportion of the employed labour force that is eligible for benefits provided by the workers' compensation system in case of work injury. Prudence is recommended in the use of these statistics.

Time-Loss Injury Incidence Rate: The time-loss injuries incidence rate is the number of time-loss injuries per 100 workers. This rate is calculated as the number of time-loss occupational injuries times 100, divided by the total number of workers for the period.

The rates shown in this publication include the total number of time-loss injuries/ claims for both assessable and self-insured employers.

Total Claims Reported: All claims reported within the reference year regardless of accident year. This includes all lost-time, no lost-time, health care only, occupational disease and fatal claims. Only those claims that have been assigned a claim number (by the end of the reference year) are included.

Total Payments (Costs): All benefit payments made for compensation during the year for current and prior work-related accident years, or "for all years paid during the year", (rather than the cost of benefits related to accidents and diseases that occurred in a specific reference year). These payments for compensation figures include those for both assessable and self-insured employers. These figures exclude any administration expense, but include all benefit types: short-term disability, long-term disability, survivors' benefits, and health care and rehabilitation services. Health care and vocational rehabilitation benefit payment costs are also excluded.

(Total payment figures shown in this publication for 1999 - 2005 exclude some compensation figures for self-insured employers in a number of jurisdictions where this information was either unavailable or not applicable. For further information, please see the Board/Commission Financial and Statistical Data, Key Statistical Measures (KSMs) section of the official web-site of the Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada (AWCBC) (Key Statistical Measures (KSMs) - Data Tables | AWCBC).

Worker or Employee: Any person who is covered by workers' compensation legislation. This includes self-employed persons who have been accepted for coverage by the Board/Commission in the worker's jurisdiction.

IV. All Jurisdictions

4.1 Historical Data, Canada, 1996 - 2008

Table 1 presents the occupational injuries and compensation data for Canada over a thirteen-year period, 1996 - 2008. Fully consistent and comparable KSM injury compensation data, in terms of definitions, reference periods, and reporting methods, are available from the AWCBC (Key Statistical Measures (KSMs) - Data Tables | AWCBC) for all jurisdictions in Canada beginning in 1996. Comparable NWISP accepted time-loss injuries data is available from the AWCBC starting in 1982, as are fatality figures, from 1993 (National Work Injury Statistics Program (NWISP) | AWCBC).

In Canada, over the period 1996 to 2008, an average of slightly less than one million occupational injury claims have been reported each year by provincial or territorial WCBs; on average, just under 400,000 (355,318) were accepted for compensation for a loss of wages (as "time-loss" injuries). In this period, the total number of claims peaked in 2000 at 1.05 million, as did accepted time-loss injuries (at 392,502).Total accepted time-loss injuries steadily declined over the next eight years, while total claims declined for the next four years, (see Charts 1 and 2). Although the total number of claims reported rose again in 2005 (by 17,659), the total number of accepted time-loss injuries continued to decline, but only slightly. Acute or traumatic accepted time-loss occupational injuries (or those that were not disease or illness -related) made up the majority of total accepted time-loss injuries and the over-all trend in these matched those of total accepted time-loss injuries over the 1996 - 2008 period (Chart 2). The incidence rate of total accepted time-loss injuries per 100 workers covered by provincial or territorial compensation systems (across all jurisdictions in Canada) has steadily declined in all years since 1996 (except 2000, see Chart 3).

On average, one out of every 46 Canadian worker covered by provincial or territorial compensation systems was injured severely enough to miss at least one day of work in 2008. This represents approximately one compensated time-loss injury for every two minutes worked, or 35 compensated time-loss injuries for every hour worked, each day, (calculated on a 24-hour working-day basis).

In Canada, there were approximately three occupational fatalities each day of the year in 2008.[7: go to footnote 7] During the year, approximately one worker out of every 13,805 workers covered by provincial or territorial compensation systems died from an occupational injury.

Over the 1996 to 2008 period, compensation payments to injured workers, after adjusting for inflation (measured in constant 2008 dollars), have generally shown an increasing trend (see Chart 4). In 2008, the WCBs paid $7.67 billion in benefits, or an average of approximately $24,845 per each new compensated ("accepted") time-loss injury or fatality (see glossary under "compensation quotient").[8: go to footnote 8] In addition, the WCBs paid $2.03 billion in health care and vocational rehabilitation payments in 2008. Including health care and vocational rehabilitation benefit payment costs, the total direct annual costs of occupational injuries to the Canadian economy were approximately $9.7 billion in 2008. When factoring in these and indirect costs[9: go to footnote 9], the total costs of occupational injuries to the Canadian economy, can now be estimated to be more than $19 billion annually.[10: go to footnote 10]

Taken all together, the information presented in Table 1, and in Charts 2 - 4, indicates that the rate of time-loss injuries have, in general, declined in Canada nationally between 1996 and 2008 at the same time as total benefit or compensation payments to injured workers have generally increased. As a result, compensation quotient figures (per accepted time-loss injuries or fatalities) have also increased in Canada, at the national level, between 1996 and 2008 (see Chart 5 and Tables 1 and 2).

4.2 Provincial/ Territorial Data, 2001 - 2008

Table 2 is a breakdown by province/ territory of the information displayed in Table 1, for the years 2001 through 2008. With the exclusion of the territories, where the number of workers is too small for conducting valid statistical comparisons, the provinces with the highest 2008 occupational fatality rates were: Newfoundland and Labrador, with a occupational fatality rate of 10.7 per 100,000 workers covered; followed by Alberta at 9.0 and Ontario at 8.2. New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had the lowest fatality rates in 2008, 4.1 and 4.5 respectively. The Canadian average for 2008 stood at 7.2 fatalities per 100,000 workers covered.

The four provinces with the highest derived 2008 compensation quotients, (derived from total benefit payments, for all years paid, excluding administrative costs, and excluding health care and vocational rehabilitation benefit payments, per accepted time-loss injury or fatality), were: Ontario, at $42,792; Newfoundland and Labrador, at $30,008; Nova Scotia at $29,887 and New Brunswick at $28,625 (Chart 6). 2008 compensation quotients were lowest in the Western provinces (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Alberta), all of which were considerably lower than the Canadian average, which was $24,845 (per accepted time-loss injury or fatality). 2008 derived compensation quotient figures for Prince Edward Island and Quebec were also noticeably lower than the national average.

The four provinces with the highest 2008 rate of accepted time-loss injuries per 100 workers covered were: Manitoba at 3.99; Saskatchewan at 3.60; British Columbia at 2.92; and Nova Scotia at 2.47. Provinces with the lowest time-loss injury incidence rates per workers covered in 2008 were Prince Edward Island at 1.30 followed closely by New Brunswick at 1.36 and Ontario at 1.61 (see Chart 7). For 2008, the Canadian average was 2.15 accepted time-loss injuries per 100 workers covered.


Footnotes

(1) Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada, National Work Injuries Statistics Program, National Work Injury and Disease Statistics, Canada, 2003 - 2008.

(2) Ibid.

(3) Ibid.

(4) For private-sector employment subject to federal jurisdiction for purposes of Part II of the Canada Labour Code (Occupational Health and Safety), workers compensation falls under the jurisdiction of the provinces. Moreover, while workers' compensation is under federal jurisdiction for employment at federal government departments and agencies, and most Crown Corporations, the applicable legislation, the Government Employees' Compensation Act, delegates the adjudication and administration of claims to the provincial workers' compensation board/commission in the province where the injured worker is usually employed, under the same rates and conditions as are found in the applicable provincial legislation. Hence, occupational injuries occurring in the federal jurisdiction are reflected in the provincial data.

(5) Jurisdictions with waiting periods are New Brunswick (3 working days), Nova Scotia (2 days) and Prince Edward Island (60% of weekly compensation). In all these jurisdictions, the waiting period is waived if the worker is absent from work for a specified period. For more information see: Workers' Compensation Benefits & Rehabilitation | AWCBC

(6) These employer reports are not based on actual workers' compensation claims. In contrast, (NWISP) data are based on the administrative records of accepted workers' compensation claims. As a result, there is a greater likelihood that the federal data may be subject to under-reporting since there is no financial incentive attached (especially for the injured worker) to having the injury reported.

(7) This is calculated on a 365 total days in the calendar year-basis, rather than on a total working day in the calendar year basis.

(8) The reader should note once again that the total benefit payment figures on which these compensation quotient figures are calculated include benefit payments made during a reference year for all claims from all years, not just the reference year. Time-loss injuries, however, relate to a specific reference year, (in which they had occurred and were accepted for compensation), as do fatalities, (the year when the claim was accepted for compensation, not the year when the incident causing the death occurred). In addition, the reader should note that total payment figures shown in this publication for 2001 - 2008 exclude some compensation figures for self-insured employers in a number of jurisdictions where this information was either unavailable or not applicable. Therefore, total payment figures for Canada are slightly under-reported, (by as much as 2 - 3%, as estimated by HRSDC Labour.)

(9) For example, the time lost by uninjured workers trying to help an injured worker, lower staff morale, damage to materials and equipment and productivity losses from injured or alternate workers. These items are often difficult to quantify.

(10) Estimates of federal jurisdiction industries show that the ratio of indirect to direct costs for occupational injuries is, on average, approximately 1:1.


Data Tables

Table 1: Historical Summary of Occupational Injuries/ Diseases and Their Cost,
1996 - 2008, Canada

Taken all together, the information in Table 1 and Charts 1 and 2, indicates that the rate of time-loss injuries have, in general, declined in Canada nationally between 1996 and 2005 at the same time as total compensation payments to injured workers have generally increased. As a result, compensation quotient figures (per accepted time-loss injuries or fatalities) have increased steadily in Canada, at the national level, between 2001 and 2008.

Year Number of Workers Covered (000s)(1.1) Claims/Injuries(1.2)
Total Claims Reported Total Accepted Time - Loss Injuries Accepted Time - Loss Injuries - Acute/ Accident(1.3) % Total Accepted Time-Loss Total Fatalities Fatalities Acute/ Accident(1.3) % Total Fatalities
1996 10,817.3 947,776 377,885 324,403 39.9 703 394 0.07
1997 11,042.8 962,134 379,851 327,414 39.5 833 433 0.09
1998 11,307.6 970,224 375,360 325,619 38.7 798 427 0.08
1999 11,593.5 996,617 379,450 324,161 38.1 835 458 0.08
2000 11,810.6 1,050,226 392,502 334,817 37.4 882 504 0.08
2001 12,019.9 1,018,914 373,216 320,051 36.6 919 495 0.09
2002 12,195.1 997,657 359,046 307,196 36.0 934 485 0.09
2003 12,805.6 980,427 348,715 296,954 35.6 963 450 0.10
2004 12,751.3 977,090 340,502 291,323 34.8 928 459 0.09
2005 13,444.9 994,749 337,930 287,996 34.0 1,097 491 0.11
2006 13,709.2 995,757 329,357 281,460 33.1 976 442 0.10
2007 14,036.3 973,465 317,524 270,058 32.6 1,055 392 0.11
2008 14,302.0 943,514 307,802 260,097 32.6 1,036 467 0.11
Average 12,448.9 985,273 355,318 303,965 36.1 920 454 0.09

Total Benefit Payments/Compensation
Year Total Payments (000s of current dollars $)(1.4) Total Payments (000s of constant 2008 dollars $)(1.4) Compensation Quotients
A
(current dollars)(1.5)
B
(current dollars)(1.5)
A
(constant 2008 dollars)(1.5)
B
(constant 2008 dollars)(1.5)
1996 $5,065,942 $6,501,957 $5,345.1 $13,381.1 $6,860.2 $17,174.2
1997 $5,153,285 $6,504,312 $5,356.1 $13,536.9 $6,760.3 $17,085.9
1998 $5,129,356 $6,410,290 $5,286.8 $13,636.2 $6,607.0 $17,041.5
1999 $5 295 980 $6,504,535 $5,314.0 $13,926.3 $6,526.6 $17,104.4
2000 $5,666,514 $6,777,246 $5,395.5 $14,404.5 $6,453.1 $17,228.1
2001 $6,085,430 $7,099,668 $5,972.5 $16,265.3 $6,967.9 $18,976.2
2002 $6,402,524 $7,305,280 $6,417.6 $17,785.8 $7,322.4 $20,293.6
2003 $6,429,450 $7,136,189 $6,557.8 $18,386.8 $7,278.7 $20,407.9
2004 $6,587,815 $7,179,271 $6,742.3 $19,294.8 $7,347.6 $21,027.1
2005 $6,777,235 $7,226,939 $6,813.0 $19,990.3 $7,265.1 $21,316.7
2006 $6,977,374 $7,297,144 $7,007.1 $21,122.2 $7,382.2 $22,090.3
2007 $6,307,020 $7,477,408 $7,506.2 $22,936.3 $7,681.2 $23,471.1
2008 $7,673,011 $7,673,011 $8,132.4 $24,844.8 $8,132.4 $24,844.8
Average $6,196,226 $7,007,173 $6,295.9 $17,654.7 $7,117.8 $19,850.9

Diseases and their Rates
Year Total Claims per 100 Workers Covered Total Accepted Time-Loss Injuries per 100 Workers Covered Total Fatalities per 100,000 Workers Covered
1996 8.76 3.49 6.50
1997 8,71 3.42 7.54
1998 8.58 3.32 7.06
1999 8.60 3.27 7.20
2000 8.89 3.32 7.47
2001 8.48 3.10 7.65
2002 8.18 2.94 7.66
2003 7.66 2.72 7.52
2004 7.66 2.67 7.28
2005 7.40 2.51 8.16
2006 7.26 2.40 7.12
2007 6.94 2.26 7.52
2008 6.60 2.15 7.24
Average 7.98 2.89 7.38

Sources

Number of employees (employment): Labour Force Survey (LFS), and Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH), Statistics Canada.

Percentage of workforce covered: Board/Commission Financial and Statistical Data, Key Statistical Measures (KSM), Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada.

Number of workers covered: (Calculated/ provided by Research and Analysis, Labour Program, HRSDC).

Total claims reported: Board/ Commission Financial and Statistical Data, Key Statistical Measures (KSM), Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada.

Accepted time-loss injuries/fatalities: National Work Injuries Statistics Program (NWISP), Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada.

Total payments: Board/ Commission Financial and Statistical Data, Key Statistical Measures (KSM), Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada.

Compensation quotients and all rates: (Calculated/ provided by Research and Analysis, Labour Program, HRSDC).

Footnotes

(1.1) Total employment figures for Canada includes paid employees only for each of the three territories (self-employment figures are not available). The "number of workers covered" figures were then derived using employment and AWCBC "percentage of workforce covered" figures. See Section 2.2 of this report for further information.

(1.2) Includes figures for both assessable employers and self-insured employers.

(1.3) Includes benefit payments for all years paid during the year for assessable employers and self-insured employers and excludes administration costs/ expenses. In some jurisdictions, data for self-insured employers was either unavailable or not applicable for reference years 2001 - 2005. Therefore, the total payment figures for Canada for 2001 - 2005 are incomplete and are not entirely representative of the actual totals for Canada for those years. HRSDC Labour estimates that the un-reported (unavailable) amounts represent approximately 2-3% of the total reported figure for Canada for each of those years. For further information, please see the Key Statistical Measures (KSM) statistical data tables and all notes provided to users on the AWCBC web-site.

(1.4) Two different compensation quotients have been provided ("A" and "B"). The first one (A) shows total compensation (benefits) payments as a function of (divided by) total claims, whereas the second (B) shows total compensation (benefit) payments as a function of (divided by) accepted time-loss and fatal injuries (combined) only.

(1.5) Two different compensation quotients have been provided ("A" and "B"). The first one (A) shows total compensation (benefits) payments as a function of (divided by) total claims, whereas the second (B) shows total compensation (benefit) payments as a function of (divided by) accepted time-loss and fatal injuries (combined) only.


Table 2: Occupational Injuries/ Diseases and their Cost, 2001 - 2008, Provinces/ Territories, Canada

("All Jurisdictions" data from the Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada)

Claims/Injuries (2.2)-Footnote 2.2
Province / Territory Year Number of Workers Covered (000s) (2.1)-Footnote 2.1 Total Claims Reported Total Accepted Time-Loss Injuries Accepted Time-Loss Injuries - Acute/Accident(2.3)-Footnote 2.3 Total Fatalities Fatalities - Acute/Accident(2.3)-Footnote 2.3
Nfld. & Labrador 2001 197.1 15,499 6,173 5,851 26 14
2002 201.0 15,014 5,517 5,268 23 9
2003 205.9 14,774 5,247 5,011 23 9
2004 207.8 14,002 4,834 4,618 23 8
2005 207.6 14,010 4,821 4,567 25 12
2006 209.2 13,648 4,577 4,358 18 7
2007 210.6 13,020 4,365 4,146 23 6
2008 215.1 14,016 4,239 4,017 23 5
Prince Edward Island 2001 56.9 5,341 1,779 1,623 5 0
2002 56.0 4,810 1,347 1,205 1 1
2003 60.1 4,562 1,241 1,109 0 0
2004 60.6 4,257 1,037 930 1 0
2005 65.7 4,153 876 809 1 1
2006 64.0 4,144 812 715 0 0
2007 66.6 4,067 870 784 2 1
2008 67.4 4,254 877 790 3 1
Nova Scotia 2001 290.2 34,701 9,082 8,684 8 5
2002 298.6 33,874 8,724 8,282 14 6
2003 307.2 33,674 8,849 8,404 18 12
2004 314.5 34,166 9,173 8,691 41 21
2005 317.7 34,017 8,998 8,031 23 10
2006 317.6 31,810 8,339 7,433 12 4
2007 325.1 32,038 8,280 7,231 14 4
2008 329.3 31,753 8,120 7,146 23 10
New Brunswick 2001 312.9 27,974 5,162 4,347 15 9
2002 322.3 27,151 4,685 4,169 17 12
2003 330.3 26,410 4,604 3,995 7 6
2004 333.4 25,409 4,185 3,649 12 8
2005 331.2 25,574 4,439 3,837 12 10
2006 333.7 25,203 4,261 3,690 15 9
2007 340.8 25,899 4,480 3,948 9 4
2008 343.6 25,691 4,686 4,215 14 12
Quebec 2001 3,251.0 161,965 112,887 82,374 180 87
2002 3,345.0 157,207 110,244 81,240 188 99
2003 3,403.1 155,358 107,160 78,373 175 73
2004 3,446.8 152,799 104,209 75,639 176 78
2005 3,470.5 144,824 99,067 68,744 223 89
2006 3,513.5 141,792 93,886 67,045 206 108
2007 3,598.3 132,107 87,186 58,995 206 58
2008 3,622.8 128,724 83,900 54,023 195 90
Ontario 2001 4,053.5 371,067 98,359 90,531 328 156
2002 4,053.1 361,179 95,568 87,636 383 162
2003 4,430.6 354,926 9,234 85,263 378 167
2004 4,222.6 352,474 90,397 82,875 365 158
2005 4,665.2 352,996 89,734 82,512 412 146
2006 4,748.8 336,851 83,179 75,917 373 135
2007 4,787.1 329,161 80,863 74,092 439 157
2008 4,846.3 312,315 78,256 71,535 396 140
Manitoba 2001 368.6 44,361 18,544 16,716 25 7
2002 358.5 42,985 17,919 16,433 19 6
2003 369.,0 42,494 17,586 15,852 24 3
2004 374.8 41,077 17,260 15,688 14 3
2005 389.9 42,062 17,785 16,278 26 5
2006 403.4 42,953 18,134 16,180 27 6
2007 414.7 42,379 17,318 15,715 28 6
2008 428.5 42,374 17,091 15,778 24 25
Saskatchewan 2001 334.2 37,653 15,065 12,838 35 11
2002 302.2 39,125 15,623 12,205 23 18
2003 346.2 38,194 15,135 11,392 35 17
2004 364.8 37,023 13,880 11,629 30 20
2005 357.7 38,999 14,170 12,288 27 13
2006 359.6 40,049 14,148 11,873 30 8
2007 372.0 40,424 13,856 11,807 29 13
2008 381.9 42,377 13,731 11,436 26 76
Alberta 2001 1,301.5 145,916 38,755 34,334 118 70
2002 1,370.1 154,474 38,426 33,857 101 62
2003 1,423.8 153,098 37,335 32,966 127 75
2004 1,454.7 154,377 35,969 31,951 124 65
2005 1,617.0 168,685 36,305 33,007 143 75
2006 1,664.9 181,159 37,557 34,073 124 54
2007 1,757.4 175,297 35,083 32,087 154 73
2008 1,849.0 167,896 32,248 30,194 166 95
British Columbia 2001 1,806.3 169,493 66,076 61,607 168 107
2002 1,840.4 156,780 59,530 55,624 158 104
2003 1,880.3 152,097 56,946 53,372 170 97
2004 1,920.6 156,770 58,289 54,532 136 86
2005 1,970.5 164,285 60,340 56,680 189 126
2006 2,043.6 172,874 63,042 58,912 160 99
2007 2,110.4 173,538 63,718 59,882 140 70
2008 2,162.3 168,408 63,159 59,687 160 83
Yukon 2001 15.1 1,370 445 367 0 0
2002 15.1 1,523 495 414 1 0
2003 15.8 1,491 442 375 1 1
2004 16.8 1,667 452 377 1 1
2005 17.3 1,823 445 381 2 2
2006 17.5 1,984 494 432 3 3
2007 18.6 2,023 578 552 2 1
2008 19.1 2,000 559 530 1 1
NWT/Nunavut 2001 32.6 3,574 889 779 11 9
2002 32.8 3,535 968 883 6 5
2003 33.1 3,349 936 842 5 2
2004 34.0 3,069 817 744 5 4
2005 34.6 3,321 950 862 10 5
2006 33.5 3,290 908 832 8 4
2007 34.8 3,512 927 819 9 4
2008 36.7 3,706 936 836 5 4
Canada 2001 12,019.9 1,018,914 373,216 320,051 919 495
2002 12,195.1 997,657 359,046 307,196 934 485
2003 12,805.6 980,427 348,715 296,954 963 450
2004 12,751.3 977,090 340,502 291,323 928 459
2005 13,444.9 994,749 337,930 287,996 1,097 491
2006 13,709.2 995,757 329,357 281,460 976 442
2007 14,306.3 973,465 317,524 270,058 1,055 392
2008 14,302.0 943,514 307,802 260,097 1,036 467

Total Benefit Payments/Compensation
Province / Territoy Year Total Payments (000s of current dollars) (2.4)-Footnote 2.4 Total Payments (000s of constant 2008 dollars) (2.4)-Footnote 2.4 Compensation Quotients
A (current dollars) (2.5)-Footnote 2.5 B (current dollars) (2.5)-Footnote 2.5 A (constant 2008 dollars) (2.5)-Footnote 5 B (constant 2008 dollars) (2.5)-Footnote 5
Nfld. & Labrador 2001 $110,660 $129,462 $7,139.8 $17,851.3 $8,352.9 $20,884.3
2002 $107,396 $122,754 $7,153.1 $19,385.6 $8,175.9 $22,157.7
2003 $117,052 $130,146 $7,922.8 $22,211.0 $8,809.1 $24,695.7
2004 $111,680 $121,804 $7,976.0 $22,993.6 $8,699.0 $25,078.0
2005 $115,172 $122,343 $8,220.7 $23,766.4 $8,732.6 $25,246.3
2006 $120,566 $125,851 $8,834.0 $26,238.5 $9,221.2 $27,388.7
2007 $117,322 $120,701 $9,010.9 $26,737.0 $9,270.4 $27,507.1
2008 $127,895 $127,895 $9,124.9 $30,008.2 $9,124.9 $30,008.2
Prince Edwards Island 2001 $18,007 $21,723 $3,371.5 $10,093.6 $4,067.2 $12,176.6
2002 $15,549 $18,270 $3,232.6 $11,534.6 $3,798.4 $13,553.5
2003 $15,679 $17,800 $3,436.9 $12,634.2 $3,901.8 $14,343.1
2004 $15,485 $17,197 $3,637.5 $14,918.1 $4,039.8 $16,567.8
2005 $15,891 $17,115 $3,826.4 $18,119.7 $4,121.0 $19,514.8
2006 $17,395 $18,315 $4,197.6 $21,422.4 $4,419.6 $22,555.0
2007 $18,304 $18,932 $4,500.6 $20,990.8 $4,655.1 $21,711.5
2008 $19,158 $19,158 $4,503.5 $21,770.5 $4,503.5 $21,770.5
Nova Scotia 2001 $140,518 $167,724 $4,049.4 $15458.5 $4,833.4 $18,451.5
2002 $142,073 $164,663 $4,194.2 $16,259.2 $4,861.0 $18,844.4
2003 $153,135 $171,647 $4,547.6 $17,270.2 $5,097.3 $19,358.0
2004 $166,632 $183,406 $4,877.1 $18,084.7 $5,368.1 $19,905.1
2005 $223,698 $239,617 $6,576.1 $24,786.5 $7,044.0 $26,550.4
2006 $210,879 $221,385 $6,629.3 $25,251.9 $6,959.6 $26,510.0
2007 $235,615 $242,736 $7,354.2 $28,407.9 $7,576.5 $29,266.4
2008 $243,370 $243,370 $7,644.5 $29,887.0 $7,664.5 $29,887.0
New Brunswick 2001 $115,803 $135,423 $4,139.7 $22,368.7 $4,841.0 $26,158.5
2002 $111,097 $125,762 $4,091.8 $23,627.6 $4,631.9 $26,746.4
2003 $115,253 $126,176 $4,364.0 $24,995.2 $4,777.6 $27,364.2
2004 $115,306 $124,429 $4,538.0 $27,473.4 $4,897.1 $29,647.2
2005 $122,279 $128,883 $4,781.4 $27,472.3 $5,039.6 $28,955.9
2006 $127,152 $131,810 $5,045.1 $12,634.2 $5,229.9 $30,825.4
2007 $127,001 $129,169 $4,903.7 $28,291.6 $4,987.4 $28,774.6
2008 $134,539 $134,539 $5,236.8 $28,625.3 $5,236.8 $28,625.3
Quebec 2001 $1,347,298 $1,549,393 $8,318.5 $11,915.9 $9,566.2 $13,703.3
2002 $1,427,091 $1,608,332 $9,077.8 $12,922.8 $10,230.7 $14,564.0
2003 $1,519,830 $1,671,072 $9,782.8 $14,159.7 $10,756.3 $15,568.7
2004 $1,557,783 $1,680,021 $10,195.0 $14,923.4 $10,995.0 $16,094.5
2005 $1,571,995 $1,657,286 $10,854.5 $15,832.4 $11,443.4 $16,691.4
2006 $1,644,080 $1,704,580 $11,595.0 $17,473.1 $12,021.7 $18,116.1
2007 $1,71,8219 $1,754,015 $13,006.3 $19,661.1 $13,277.2 $20,070.7
2008 $1,755,041 $1,755,041 $13,634.1 $20,869.7 $13,634.1 $20,869.7
Ontario 2001 $2,508,000 $2,899,555 $6,758.9 $25,413.7 $7,814.1 $29,381.3
2002 $2,599,000 $2,944,667 $7,195.9 $27,086.7 $8,152.9 $30,689.3
2003 $2,705,000 $2,984,192 $7,621.3 $28,895.9 $8,407.9 $31,878.3
2004 $2,813,550 $3,047,564 $7,982.3 $30,999.2 $8,646.2 $33,577.5
2005 $2,909,791 $3,083,997 $8,243.1 $32,278.6 $8,736.6 $34,211.1
2006 $2,983,995 $3,107,414 $8,858.5 $35,714.2 $9,224.9 $37,191.4
2007 $3,182,736 $3,254,549 $9,669.2 $39,147.1 $9,887.4 $40,030.4
2008 $3,365,638 $3,365,638 $10,776.4 $42,791.5 $10,776.4 $42,791.5
Manitoba 2001 $141,682 $163,114 $3,193.8 $7,630.0 $3,677.0 $8,784.2
2002 $137,076 $155,444 $3,188.9 $7,641.7 $3,616.2 $8,665.6
2003 $143,375 $159,712 $3,374.0 $8,141.7 $3,758.5 $9,069.4
2004 $147,993 $161,680 $3,602.8 $8,567.4 $3,936.0 $9,359.7
2005 $152,599 $162,333 $3,628.0 $8,567.7 $3,859.4 $9,114.2
2006 $161,978 $168,982 $3,771.1 $8,919.0 $3,934.1 $9,304.6
2007 $172,842 $176,738 $4,078.5 $9,964.4 $4,170.4 $10,189.0
2008 $191,319 $191,319 $4,515.0 $11,178.4 $4,515.0 $11,178.4
Saskatchewan 2001 $163,398 $194,834 $4,339.6 $10,821.1 $5,174.5 $12,902.9
2002 $175,175 $203,028 $4,477.3 $11,196.2 $5,189.2 $12,976.3
2003 $169,634 $192,186 $4,441.4 $11,182.2 $5,031.8 $12,668.8
2004 $169,624 $187,949 $4,581.6 $12,194.4 $5,076.5 $13,511.8
2005 $164,801 $178,676 $4,225.8 $11,608.2 $4,581.5 $12,585.5
2006 $172,541 $183,295 $4,308.2 $12,169.6 $4,576.8 $12,928.1
2007 $173,109 $178,818 $4,282.3 $12,467.3 $4,423.6 $12,878.5
2008 $183,856 $183,856 $4,338.6 $13,364.5 $4,338.6 $13,364.5
Alberta 2001 $578,485 $727,443 $3,964.5 $14,881.4 $4,985.4 $18,713.3
2002 $765,806 $931,220 $4,957.5 $19,877.1 $6,028.3 $24,170.6
2003 $574,194 $668,793 $3,750.5 $15,327.4 $4,368.4 $17,852.6
2004 $550,336 $631,925 $3,564.9 $15,247.7 $4,093.4 $17,508.2
2005 $537,133 $604,213 $3,184.2 $14,737.0 $3,581.9 $16,577.4
2006 $564,262 $610,991 $3,114.7 $14,966.8 $3,372.7 $16,206.2
2007 $550,754 $568,038 $3,141.8 $15,630.0 $3,240.4 $16,120.5
2008 $574,897 $574,897 $3,424.1 $17,736.1 $3,424.1 $17,736.1
British Columbia 2001 $932,354 $1,071,682 $5,500.8 $14,074.5 $6,322.9 $16,177.8
2002 $888,608 $997,907 $5,667.9 $14,887.5 $6,365.0 $16,718.7
2003 $882,693 $969,926 $5,803.5 $15,454.4 $6,377.0 $16,981.7
2004 $907,688 $978,247 $5,789.9 $15,536.0 $6,240.0 $167,43.6
2005 $932,079 $984,689 $5,673.5 $15,398.9 $5,993.8 $16,268.1
2006 $938,138 $974,587 $5,426.7 $14,843.5 $5,637.6 $15,420.2
2007 $973,694 $994,053 $5,610.8 $15,247.8 $5,728.2 $15,566.6
2008 $1,036,588 $1,036,588 $6,155.2 $16,370.9 $6,155.2 $16,370.9
Yukon 2001 $10,829 $12,367 $7,904.4 $24,334.8 $9,026.8 $27,790.2
2002 $12,617 $14,308 $8,284.3 $25,437.5 $9,394.4 $28,846.1
2003 $12,716 $14,151 $8,528.5 $28,704.3 $9,491.0 $31,943.7
2004 $12,423 $13,677 $7,452.3 $27,423.8 $8,204.8 $30,192.9
2005 $12,851 $13,840 $7,049.4 $28,749.4 $7,591.6 $30,960.9
2006 $15,854 $16,834 $7,990.9 $31,899.4 $8,484.7 $33,870.7
2007 $15,368 $15,915 $7,596.6 $26,496.6 $7,867.2 $27,440.3
2008 $15,280 $15,280 $7,640.0 $27,285.7 $7,640.0 $27,285.7
NWT/Nunavut 2001 $18,396 $21,825 $5,147.2 $20,440.0 $6,106.6 $24,250.1
2002 $21,036 $24,233 $5,950.8 $21,597.5 $6,855.3 $24,880.4
2003 $20,889 $23,523 $6,237.4 $22,198.7 $7,023.9 $24,998.0
2004 $19,315 $21,436 $6,293.6 $23,497.6 $6,984.8 $26,078.2
2005 $18,946 $20,552 $5,704.9 $19,735.4 $6,188.4 $21,407.9
2006 $20,534 $21,964 $6,241.3 $22,417.0 $6,676.0 $23,978.1
2007 $22,056 $22,932 $6,280.2 $23,564.1 $6,529.6 $24,499.9
2008 $25,430 $25,430 $6,861.8 $27,024.4 $6,861.8 $27,024.4
Canada 2001 $6,085,430 $7,099,668 $5,957.2 $16,265.3 $6,967.9 $18,976.2
2002 $6,402,524 $7,305,280 $6,417.6 $17,785.8 $7,322.4 $20,293.6
2003 $6,429,450 $7,136,189 $6,557.8 $18,386.8 $7,278.7 $20,407.9
2004 $6,587,815 $7,179,271 $6,742.3 $19,294.8 $7,347.6 $21,027.1
2005 $6,777,235 $7,226,939 $6,813.0 $19,990.3 $7,265.1 $21,316.7
2006 $6,977,374 $7,297,144 $7,007.1 $21,122.2 $7,328.2 $22,090.3
2007 $7,307,020 $7,477,408 $7,506.2 $22,936.3 $7,681.2 $23,471.1
2008 $7,673,011 $7,673,011 $8,132.4 $24,844.8 $8,132.4 $24,844.8

Rates
Province / Territory Year Total Claims per 100 Workers Covered Total Accepted Time-Loss Injuries per 100 Workers Fatalities per 100,000 Workers Covered
Nfld. & Labrador 2001 7.86 3.13 13.19
2002 7.47 2.74 11.44
2003 7.18 2.55 11.17
2004 6.74 2.33 11.07
2005 6.75 2.32 12.04
2006 6.52 2.19 8.60
2007 6.18 2.07 10.92
2008 6.52 1.97 10.69
Prince Edward Island 2001 9.38 3.13 8.78
2002 8.58 2.40 1.78
2003 7.59 2.06 0.00
2004 7.03 1.71 1.65
2005 6.32 1.33 1.52
2006 6.48 1.27 0.00
2007 6.10 1.31 3.00
2008 6.31 1.30 4.45
Nova Scotia 2001 11.96 3.13 2.76
2002 11.35 2.92 4.69
2003 10.96 2.88 5.86
2004 10.86 2.92 13.04
2005 10.71 2.83 8.50
2006 10.02 2.63 3.78
2007 9.86 2.55 4.31
2008 9.64 2.47 6.98
New Brunswick 2001 8.94 1.65 4.79
2002 8.42 1.45 5.28
2003 8.00 1.39 2.12
2004 7.62 1.26 3.60
2005 7.71 1.34 3.62
2006 7.55 1.28 4.50
2007 7.60 1.31 2.64
2008 7.48 1.36 4.07
Quebec 2001 4.98 3.47 5.54
2002 4.70 3.30 5.62
2003 4.57 3.15 5.14
2004 4.43 3.02 5.11
2005 4.64 2.85 6.43
2006 4.04 2.67 5.86
2007 3.67 2.42 5.72
2008 3.55 2.32 5.38
Ontario 2001 9.15 2.43 8.09
2002 8.91 2.36 9.45
2003 8.01 2.10 8.53
2004 8.35 2.14 8.64
2005 7.57 1.92 8.83
2006 7.09 1.75 7.85
2007 6.88 1.69 9.17
2008 6.44 1.61 8.17
Manitoba 2001 12.03 5.03 6.78
2002 11.99 5.00 5.30
2003 11.51 4.77 6.50
2004 10.96 4.61 3.74
2005 10.79 4.56 6.67
2006 10.65 4.48 6.69
2007 10.22 4.18 6.75
2008 9.89 3.99 5.60
Saskatchewan 2001 11.27 4.51 10.47
2002 12.94 5.17 7.61
2003 11.03 4.37 10.11
2004 10.15 3.80 8.22
2005 10.90 3.96 7.55
2006 11.14 3.93 8.34
2007 10.87 3.72 7.80
2008 11.10 3.60 6.81
Alberta 2001 11.21 2.98 9.07
2002 11.28 2.80 7.37
2003 10.75 2.62 8.92
2004 10.61 2.47 8.52
2005 10.43 2.25 8.84
2006 10.88 2.26 7.45
2007 9.97 2.00 8.76
2008 9.08 1.74 8.98
British Columbia 2001 9.53 3.66 9.30
2002 8.52 3.23 8.59
2003 8.09 3.03 9.04
2004 8.16 3.03 7.08
2005 8.34 3.06 9.59
2006 8.46 3.08 7.83
2007 8.22 3.02 6.63
2008 7.79 2.92 7.40
Yukon 2001 9.08 2.95 0.00
2002 10.08 3.28 6.62
2003 9.44 2.80 6.33
2004 9.93 2.69 5.96
2005 10.55 2.57 11.57
2006 11.32 2.82 17.11
2007 10.89 3.11 10.77
2008 10.49 2.93 5.24
NWT/Nunavut 2001 10.96 2.73 33.74
2002 10.78 2.95 18.29
2003 10.12 2.83 15.11
2004 9.03 2.40 14.71
2005 9.60 2.75 28.90
2006 9.82 2.71 23.88
2007 10.09 2.66 25.86
2008 10.10 2.55 13.62
Canada 2001 8.48 3.10 7.65
2002 8.18 2.94 7.66
2003 7.66 2.72 7.52
2004 7.66 2.67 7.28
2005 7.40 2.51 8.16
2006 7.26 2.40 7.12
2007 6.94 2.26 7.52
2008 6.60 2.15 7.24

Sources:

Number of employees (employment): Labour Force Survey (LFS), and Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH), Statistics Canada.

Percentage of workforce covered: Board/ Commission Financial and Statistical Data, Key Statistical Measures (KSM), Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada. (KSMs) - Data Tables | AWCBC)

Number of workers covered: (Calculated/ provided by Research and Analysis, Labour Program, HRSDC)

Total claims reported: Board/ Commission Financial and Statistical Data, Key Statistical Measures (KSM), Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada. (KSMs) - Data Tables | AWCBC)

Accepted time-loss injuries/ fatalities: National Work Injuries Statistics Program (NWISP), Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada.

Total payments: Board/ Commission Financial and Statistical Data, Key Statistical Measures (KSM), Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada.

Compensation quotients and all rates: (Calculated/ provided by Research and Analysis, Labour Program, HRSDC)

Footnotes:

(2.1) Total employment figures for Canada includes paid employees only for each of the three territories (self-employment figures are not available). The "number of workers covered" figures were then derived using employment and AWCBC "percentage of workforce covered" figures. See Section 2.2 of this report for further information.

(2.2) Includes figures for both assessable employers and self-insured employers. Note: Some totals shown here may not match other figures presented elsewhere, due to on-going, or periodic, updates made to the NWISP databases.

(2.3) Refers to accepted claims with claim type equal to injury, or fatality, and nature of injury/ disease codes equal to 00-09, (traumatic injuries and disorders);
excludes all other nature of disease codes, (illness or disease-related).

(2.4) Includes benefit payments for all years paid during the year for assessable employers and self-insured employers; excludes administration costs/ expenses. In some jurisdictions, data for self-insured employers was either unavailable or not applicable for reference years 2001 - 2008. Therefore, the total payment figures for Canada for 2001 - 2008 are incomplete and are not entirely representative of the actual totals for Canada for those years. HRSDC Labour estimates that the un-reported (unavailable) amounts represent approximately 2 - 3% of the total reported figure for Canada for each of those years. For further information, please see the Key Statistical Measures (KSM) statistical data tables and all notes provided to users on the AWCBC web-site. (Key Statistical Measures (KSMs) - Data Tables | AWCBC)

Please note that for the total payments in constant 2008 dollar figures, the Canada total is not equal to the sum of the provincial/ territorial figures because different annual consumer price indices were published by Statistics Canada and were used in these calculations for Canada, and for each province and territory.

(2.5) Two different compensation quotients have been provided ("A" and "B"). The first one (A) shows total compensation (benefits) payments as a function of (divided by) total claims, whereas the second (B) shows total compensation (benefit) payments as a function of (divided by) accepted time-loss and fatal injuries (combined) only.


Charts

Chart 1: Total Number of Occupational Injury Claims Reported, ('000s), 1996 - 2008, Canada (*)

Chart 1 : description follows image
Chart Description - Chart 1: Total Number of Occupational Injury Claims Reported, (thousands), 1996 - 2008, Canada
Year Total Accepted Time-Loss Injuries (thousands)
1996 948
1997 962
1998 970
1999 997
2000 1,050
2001 1,018
2002 998
2003 980
2004 977
2005 995
2006 996
2007 973
2008 944

(*) All jurisdictions
Source: National Work Injury Statistics Program (NWISP), Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada.

Chart 2: Total Number of Accepted Time-Loss Occupational Injuries, and Total Number of Acute/ Accidental Time-Loss Occupational Injuries, 1996 - 2008, Canada (*)

Chart 2 : description follows image
Year Total Accepted Time - Loss Injuries Accepted Time - Loss Injuried - Acute/Accident
1996 378 324
1997 380 327
1998 375 326
1999 379 324
2000 393 335
2001 373 320
2002 359 307
2003 349 297
2004 341 291
2005 338 288
2006 329 281
2007 318 270
2008 308 260

(*) All jurisdictions
Source: National Work Injury Statistics Program (NWISP), Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada.

Chart 3: Incidence Rate of Accepted Time-Loss Injuries per 100 Workers Covered, 1996 - 2008, Canada(*)

Chart 3 : description follows image
Year Total Accepted Time-Loss Injuries per 100 Workers Covered
1996 3.49
1997 3.42
1998 3.32
1999 3.27
2000 3.32
2001 3.10
2002 2.94
2003 2.72
2004 2.67
2005 2.51
2006 2.40
2007 2.26
2008 2.15

(*) All jurisdictions
Source: National Work Injuries Statistics Program (NWISP); Key Statistical Measures (KSM), Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada and Statistics Canada (for employment figures). Rates calculated/ provided by Research & Analysis, Labour Program, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.

Chart 4: Total Benefit Payments in '000,000s of 2008 Constant $, 1996 - 2008, Canada (*)

Chart 4 : description follows image
Year Total Payments (000s of constant 2008 dollars $)
1996 6,502
1997 6,504
1998 6,410
1999 6,505
2000 6,777
2001 7,100
2002 7,305
2003 7,136
2004 7,179
2005 7,227
2006 7,297
2007 7,477
2008 7,673

(*) All jurisdictions
Data does not include benefit payments for self-insured employers in some jurisdictions where such payments were not applicable or were not available. As a result, total payments figures for Canada are under-estimated (under-reported).
Source: Board/ Commission Financial and Statistical Data; Key Statistical Measures (KSM), Association of Workers' Compensation boards of Canada.

Chart 5: Derived Compensation Quotients, 2008 Constant $, 1996 - 2008, Canada (*)

Chart 5 : description follows image
Year Compensation Quotient B - constant 2008 dollars)
1996 17,174.2
1997 17,085.9
1998 17,041.5
1999 17,104.4
2000 17,228.1
2001 18,976.2
2002 20,293.6
2003 20,407.9
2004 21,027.1
2005 21,316.7
2006 22,090.3
2007 23,471.1
2008 24,844.8

(*) All jurisdictions
Data does not include benefit payments for self-insured employers in some jurisdictions where such payments were not applicable or were not available. As a result, total payments figures for Canada are under-estimated (under-reported).
Source: Board/ Commission Financial and Statistical Data; Key Statistical Measures (KSM), Association of Workers' Compensation boards of Canada.

Chart 6: Derived Compensation Quotients, 2008, Canada, Provinces and Territories (*)

Chart 6 : description follows image
Chart Description - Chart 6: Derived Compensation Quotients, 2008, Canada, Provinces and Territories
Province / Territoy Compensation Quotient B (constant 2008 dollars)
Newfoundland & Labrador $30,008.2
Prince Edwards Island $21,770.5
Nova Scotia $29,887.0
New Brunswick $28,625.3

Quebec

$20,869.7
Ontario $42,791.5
Manitoba $11,178.4
Saskatchewan $13,364.5
Alberta $17,736.1
British Columbia $16,370.9
Yukon $27,285.7
Northwest Territories / Nunavut $27,024.4
Canada $24,844.8

(*) All jurisdictions
Data does not include benefit payments for self-insured employers in some jurisdictions where such payments were not applicable or were not available. As a result, total payments figures for Canada are under-estimated (under-reported).
Source: Board/ Commission Financial and Statistical Data; Key Statistical Measures (KSM), Association of Workers' Compensation boards of Canada.

Chart 7: Incidence Rate of Accepted Time-Loss Injuries per 100 Workers Covered, 2001-2008, Provinces/ Territories

Chart 7 : description follows image
Chart Description - Chart 7: Incidence Rate of Accepted Time-Loss Injuries per 100 Workers Covered, 2001-2008, Provinces/ Territories
Province / Territory Year Total Accepted Time-Loss Injuries per 100 Workers
Newfoundland & Labrador 2001 3.13
2002 2.74
2003 2.55
2004 2.33
2005 2.32
2006 2.19
2007 2.07
2008 1.97
Prince Edward Island 2001 3.13
2002 2.40
2003 2.06
2004 1.71
2005 1.33
2006 1.27
2007 1.31
2008 1.30
Nova Scotia 2001 3.13
2002 2.92
2003 2.88
2004 2.92
2005 2.83
2006 2.63
2007 2.55
2008 2.47
New Brunswick 2001 1.65
2002 1.45
2003 1.39
2004 1.26
2005 1.34
2006 1.28
2007 1.31
2008 1.36
Quebec 2001 3.47
2002 3.30
2003 3.15
2004 3.02
2005 2.85
2006 2.67
2007 2.42
2008 2.32
Ontario 2001 2.43
2002 2.36
2003 2.10
2004 2.14
2005 1.92
2006 1.75
2007 1.69
2008 1.61
Manitoba 2001 5.03
2002 5.00
2003 4.77
2004 4.61
2005 4.56
2006 4.48
2007 4.18
2008 3.99
Saskatchewan 2001 4.51
2002 5.17
2003 4.37
2004 3.80
2005 3.96
2006 3.93
2007 3.72
2008 3.60
Alberta 2001 2.98
2002 2.80
2003 2.62
2004 2.47
2005 2.25
2006 2.26
2007 2.00
2008 1.74
British Columbia 2001 3.66
2002 3.23
2003 3.03
2004 3.03
2005 3.06
2006 3.08
2007 3.02
2008 2.92
Yukon 2001 2.95
2002 3.28
2003 2.80
2004 2.69
2005 2.57
2006 2.82
2007 3.11
2008 2.93
NorthWest Territories / Nunavut 2001 2.73
2002 2.95
2003 2.83
2004 2.40
2005 2.75
2006 2.71
2007 2.66
2008 2.55
Canada 2001 3.10
2002 2.94
2003 2.72
2004 2.67
2005 2.51
2006 2.40
2007 2.26
2008 2.15